Latitude: 
29° 15' South
Longitude: 
153° 50'
Conditions: 
Wind: Nor'East at 18 kts, Temp:15, Sea State 3 in rain squalls. Sailing under nine sails.
Situation at 20:00-

Last night during the First watch the wind backed to the Nor'East as expected. We were able to head South under sail alone and in the last 24 hours we have made good almost 150 miles. The price we have had to pay for these favourable winds is that we have had rain all day with some of the heavier squalls bringing torrential downpours.

The day started with a large number of green faces turning to for morning brief. Navigator Aaron briefed us on our progress overnight
and noted that the Red watch recorded the fastest speed with a short period of 10.6 knots. He also showed us his 'Spewometer' which was almost off the scale. Because of the hard work by all hands, the wet weather and the high spewometer reading, Executive Officer Paul altered the daily plan and declared a Siesta once happy hour was completed. This allowed those Youth Crew members not on watch to get their heads down for a few hours. This proved to be a very wise move because most of the Youth Crew have now found their sea legs and were able to enjoy Chef Karen's magnificant lunch and supper. During the afternoon, Navigator Aaron and Watch Officer Luke mustered the Youth
Crew for lectures on Navigation and the Rules of the Road respectively.

Overnight we plan to follow the 100 fathom line in order to take advantage of the East Australian Current as we continue South towards Coffs Harbour where we hope to anchor tomorrow morning. The Youth Crew will be busy with team building exercises and sail handling drills during their watches tonight, but are looking forward to the
chance to get ashore for a few hours tomorrow.

YOUNG ENDEAVOUR Fact File: The Ship's hull is made of steel. The deck is laid teak over marine plywood. The masts and spars are made of aluminium.

YOUNG ENDEAVOUR Glossary: Dead-Light - A shutter of wood or metal used to seal a vessel's scuttles from the sea and light. Mainsail - The largest fore-and-aft sail on a vessel. It is also called the 'Spanker'.

Thought of the day: When you set out to eat an
Elephant, take small bites and chew well. Lesley Cowan.



Yours, Aye

John Cowan,