Voyage name: 
V10/18 Sydney to Newcastle
11 Jun - 21 Jun 2018
Latitude: 
36 12.8' S
Longitude: 
150 29.4' E
Conditions: 

Weather - fine, Wind - 280 / 18 kn, Swell - from NE at 0.5m, Temp: 16 deg. C

G’day Shipmates,

Welcome to day 3 of our adventure under sail. The ship continued sailing SSW overnight along the NSW coast on a beam reach. Overnight the wind remained westerly, at times freshening to over 20 knots and a 1.5m north-easterly swell was experienced. This wind, with a little help from the East Australia Current (EAC), enabled us to average 6.2 knots and achieve a maximum speed over the ground of 10 kn overnight. The rolling motion this generated did not deter our Youth Crew who remained immersed in the challenge of sailing a tall ship.

With the rising of the sun, the promise of a new day and a cheerful Wakey Wakey song from Guv’s retro repertoire, the remainder of the crew awoke after their first night at sea in Australia’s National Sail Training Ship.

After another of Marcus’ spectacular breakfasts we gathered on the bridge for the morning brief. Today the crew heard from ‘Salty the Sea-Dog’ (Baggers) who shared some more nautical nonsense with us and I gave the crew an inspirational quote from Theodore Roosevelt. This provided a lead-in to the much-loved Happy Hour.

On completion the watches continued with practical setting and furling training up to lunch time. At 1300 Engineer Horto conducted round 1 of Rope Races. This activity is a competition between the watches to test their retention of ship knowledge.

The intention is to remain at anchor overnight and weighing anchor in the morning to conduct training in setting and furling the square sails.

At 1400 Watch Officer Baggers gave the youthies a briefing on Nautical Rules of the Road, the international IMO sanctioned rules that aim to prevent water craft from colliding.

At about 1430 the Ship was buzzed by a couple of Navy helicopters based at the nearby HMAS Albatross Naval Air Station near Nowra. Sail handling continued after this until dinner. Then the crew began night watches, which will continue through the night. No doubt they will sleep well tonight, when not on watch, after a very busy and successful day.

Until tomorrow.

 

Yours Aye

Captain Mike