Latitude: 
0° 0' South
Longitude: 
0° 0' East
Conditions: 
AT SEA 13 MILES EAST OF PORT BOTANY WITH A 20 - 25 KT NOR' EASTER.
SITUATION AT 1900

Well the YC have had a huge day today. This morning commenced at anchor in Rose Bay, with some early morning activities which
served to blow off the cobwebs and open some weary eyes. Everyone then turned to breakfast to energise themselves and get ready for the huge task ahead, to learn all the sails and lines and to be able to
work them and put the ship to sea. This was going to be no mean feat given the lack of sleep, the heat and humidity. The breeze we had been experiencing overnight had died off to a whisper, and we were in for a scorcher.

After our ritual morning brief the YC threw themselves into the task of ensuring the Ship was clean and ready for sea before
getting into the larger task for the day, Line Handling and Deck Safety lessons. This took them right through until about 1300, when Bullet (XO) decided that we really needed to wake everyone up so he declared the YOUNG ENDEAVOUR Public Swimming Pool open for use. After a quick dip and a freshen off we weighed anchor to rousing cheers and commenced our transit of the Harbour. At about 1530 with our staysails set and the engines switched to the OFF position we exited the Heads, southbound for Jervis Bay.

At about 1700 we conducted some tacking drills to ensure the YC were all ready to take on the task should they be needed to
overnight, before calling it a day.
Meanwhile, Polly our erudite Cheffo, had been slaving away in the Galley to produce a fine evening meal. Unfortunately only about half the YC were capable of stomaching
a full meal, but those who did enjoyed their meal immensely. As we settle in for night watches, I am very proud of the way the YC have handled themselves today and I know this bodes well for an excellent voyage.

Youth Crew Entry from Clare Randall Age 17 of Terrey Hills.

'The Young Endeavour for me was a chance to experience an adventure on which I could challenge myself to the greatest limits and a chance to work with a group of people I knew nothing about. So far this new and exciting experience has done all of that. I have met some wonderful new people and I'm having fun getting to know them. Challenging yourself can be hard, as you feel the urge to give up constantly, I have managed to overcome this and challenged myself by
climbing aloft and having little to no personal space. I really didn't know what to expect when I came on board, but now I am really glad I did. I am positive and excited about meeting the days ahead of me.'

Clare

YOUNG ENDEAVOUR Mariner Speak:

To Belay a Line (to take turns) - To fasten a line (rope) to a belaying pin, cleat or bollard by turning up the line enough times to make it fast.This is done when setting or furling sails or infact in just about any evolution a Tall Ship undertakes.

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY:

'Never look down to test the ground before taking your next step: Only he who keeps his eye firmly fixed on the horison will find his
right road'

- Dag Hammarskjold - Sec Gen of the United Nations

More to follow,

Paul Barrie
Acting Commanding Officer