Latitude: 
35° 8' South
Longitude: 
150° 44' East
Conditions: 
At anchor in Jervis Bay in position 35 08 S 150 44 E. Wind: Westerly at 15 kts, Sky overcast and raining
Situation at 21:00-

It was a very busy night for all hands with numerous sail changes and tacking stations piped at 02:00. The wind wouldn't make up its mind where it wanted to blow from and kept jumping all around the compass. At morning brief, Watch Officer Bullet enlightened us on the nautical origins behind the phrase 'Son of a Gun'. Chef Polly did the honours this morning and harvested a full bag of scran from all the messdecks.

After morning tea, Captain John described the theory of sailing and how it put into practise in YOUNG ENDEAVOUR. Just before
lunch, the Ship anchored in Jervis Bay, near the RAN College at HMAS CRESWELL. As soon as lunch was finished, Watch Officer Bullet started ferrying the Youth Crew ashore for an afternoon on the beach and a chance to visit the local canteen. The swimming and sport was terrific and all hands enjoyed the chance to stretch their legs for a few hours.

Chef Polly prepared a magnificent barbeque for supper and soon after arriving back onboard all hands were enjoying steak, snags
and kebabs finished off with a Pavlova. The Youth Crew have just finished their three-way talks where they were required to learn
details about each others lives and then brief the Ship's Company as if they were that person. It was lots of laughs and we all know lots more about one another. The anchor watches are now set and all hands
are looking forward to a relatively quiet night with only a short time required on deck.

YOUNG ENDEAVOUR Fact File:The Ship flies the Australian National Flag and Australian White Ensgin signifying her as a Ship of
the Royal Australian Navy. She also flies the YOUNG ENDEAVOUR house flag which is comprised of an Admiralty anchor superimposed over the Southern Cross.

YOUNG ENDEAVOUR Glossary:'Come Up'- An order which tells all hands who have been taking the strain on a line to let go and allow
it to be belayed. Stoppers-Short lengths of rope used to temporarily hold a line under strain until it can be properly belayed.

Thought of the day: We have suffered, starved and triumphed, grovelled down yet grasped at glory...grown bigger in the business of the whole. Sir Enrest Shackleton, at South Georgia Island, 1916,
while leading his men to safety after their Ship was crushed in the ice of the Antarctic.



Yours, Aye

John Cowan
LCDR, RAN