Latitude: 
24° 57' South
Longitude: 
153° 43'
Conditions: 
- At sea in position 24 57 S, 153 41 E. Wind:NW Wind at 8 kts. Sailing under seven sails, making ground to the North in order to round Breaksea Spit.
Situation at 20:00


The wind finally made an appearance at the start of the morning watch (04:00-08:00). The \Iron Jib\" was furled and we sailed Northward making good 4 knots. The watch-on-deck was treated to a
>spectacular view of the Moon setting and the Sun rising on opposite sides of the horizon only a few minutes apart.


Today's morning brief included Engineer Stewy showing off his latest harvest for the \"scran bag\". This was followed by happy hour then morning tea. Setting the square sails occupied the remainder of the forenoon, and provided ample opportunity for the Youth Crew to gain confidence working aloft. The afternoon was taken up by
Navigator Aaron explaining the mysteries of navigation and Watch Officer Lozza providing a practical example of the Rules of the road
for avoiding collision at sea.


Despite the calm seas, there are still several green faces around the Ship and there has been a lot of talking to the Dolphins happening. So much so that Chef Polly is starting to develop a
complex. The forecast is for further light winds so hopefully all hands will soon find their sea legs.


Currently we are sailing, but once again, the lack of wind will shortly require that we bring an engine on line so that we can stay on schedule and reach our first anchorage tomorrow afternoon.


YOUNG ENDEAVOUR fact file: The Ship is navigated by means of a Magnetic compass and a Gyro compass. When out of sight of land celestrial navigation techniques and a Global Positioning System provide regular updates of the Ship's position.


Thought of the day: When the morning's freshness has been replaced by the weariness of mid-day, when the leg muscles quiver under the strain, the climb seems endless, and, suddenly, nothing will go quite as you wish - it is then that you must not hesitate!! Dag Hammarskjold


Yours, Aye


John Cowan


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