Voyage name: 
V03/18 Sydney to Devonport
29 Jan - 08 Feb 2018
Latitude: 
39 54.6'S
Longitude: 
147 50.1' E
Conditions: 

Weather - fine, partly cloudy, Wind: NW at 3 kn, Swell - nil, Temp: 18 deg. C

Ahoy there Shipmates,

Overnight the ship continued motor-sailing towards Flinders Is in a 10-15 kn breeze that started from the south-east and eventually backed to north-westerly by the morning watch. Engineer Mark (Horto) and I commenced the ‘Captain’s Setting and Furling Drills at 0700, which enable us to evaluate each watch’s ability to safely set and furl sails, without staff present. This is a requirement before progressing to Command Day. All three watches passed the assessment. On completion I issued the youth crew with my ‘Captain’s Challenge’ which was to set all of the Fore-and-Aft sails and navigate us into Marshall Bay on the western side of Flinders Is, our planned anchorage for tonight. The youthies commenced my challenge at 0930 and by 1045 we were well on our way into the bay. So as to allow us to get everyone ashore as soon as possible after lunch we took control of the Ship back from the youth crew then and by 1100 we were anchored in the north of the bay, just south of Leeka.

Following lunch we ferried the Youth Crew ashore in the Seaboat for some exercise and to have a break from the Ship for the first time in 4 days. The last boatload of crew returned onboard at 1700 and once everyone was accounted for and had showered I gave my Command Day briefing.

At 1800 we enjoyed a ‘Teak Deck’ BBQ on the upper decks cooked by Chef Marcus and Watch Officer Evan (Salty the Seadog’s alter-ego) while we enjoyed the views of the Marshall Bay foreshore. At 1900 I gave the youth crew an hour to conduct their command day elections. At 2000 Youth Crew Captain Isaac Hampton provided me with a copy of his able-bodied crew list for command day.

Congratulations to all members of the Youth Crew for what they have achieved in the Voyage so far and to those successful office holders for Command Day. Next we screened the film ‘Around Cape Horn’, which details the adventures of Captain Irving Johnson when he sailed as an ordinary seaman through storms around Cape Horn onboard the massive bark ‘Peking’.

The intention is to remain in our current anchorage overnight. Staff will weigh anchor mid-morning tomorrow and close the distance from Devonport before handing over the Ship to the Youth Crew at 1300 tomorrow. That will begin the adventure and challenge that is Command Day in Young Endeavour.

Until tomorrow evening when we will also hear from Youth Captain Isaac.


Yours Aye
Captain Mike