Voyage name: 
V02/20 Hobart to Melbourne
18 Jan - 28 Jan 2020
Latitude: 
42 08s
Longitude: 
148 17e
Conditions: 
Wind: S at 17 knots Weather: Overcast, passing showers, cold Sea: Calm Location: At anchor Coles Bay
Ahoy shipmates. After a relatively mild (but cold) night at sea in light conditions, we arrived at anchor in the beautiful Wineglass Bay. After the usual morning antics (morning brief, happy hour and a navigation brief), we filled the youth crews bellies with lunch then ferried them ashore to work it off...a leisurely 9km hike around the bay and over to Coles Bay, our overnight anchorage. Whilst they trekked, the remaining staffies sailed the ship around to meet them at the other end. Trust me, the walk was the better option...a little bit bouncy by boat. We have just completed 3 way talks, where we get to know a bit more about our young adventurers, and as I write we are settling into anchor watches overnight, with the youth crew helping to keep the ship safe. That's about it from me...I'll hand you over to Lucy and Sarah to fill in the details. Until tomorrow, fair winds, Captain Kenny.---------- Captain’s Log Day 3: Hobart to Melbourne.Last night we experienced our first night watches, with Red Watch taking the first shift. White watch came along for the guts watch, and Blue watch sailed us into the sunrise. We were lucky enough to catch a glimpse of several pods of dolphins, glowing in the bioluminescent algae, and passed plenty of trawlers through the night. After experiencing our first open water sail, and a few of us feeding the fish (if you know what I mean), we anchored at Wineglass Bay early in the morning. We had a visit from Nanna, who scurried through our rooms collecting loose belongings and giving us a house cleaning lecture along the way. We then received a history lesson from Salty, Captain Morgan and Cheeky Jack, who told us the tale of the origins of some nautical terms. Way back in the day when Abel Tasman first landed in Tasmania, his ship was carrying guano, or bird poo in layman’s terms. When this was stored below decks and exposed to sea water, it produced the explosive methane gas. Poor Cheeky Jack had to do the rounds below deck and ended up losing an arm when he accidently produced an explosion with his lantern. From then on, guano was shipped in containers that bore the letters S.H.I.T, for Store High In Transit. After a scrumptious lunch of surf n turf and pork belly, we got into the sea boat and headed for a wet landing in Wineglass Bay. After a few objects and people falling into the water we all began our hike to the Wine Glass Bay look out. While challenging, it was a nice change from the constant rocking of the ship and we were rewarded with a stunning view at the top. We then had a leisurely stroll from the lookout to Coles Bay. For the coffee and ice cream addicts amongst us, Coles Bay surely satisfied. As we were tucking into our ice cream, we noticed two little girls busking in front of a café, so we gathered a few coins and headed over to sing along with them. Just as we thought the adventure was over, Schnitty decided to jump into the freezing cold water without having brought a towel, providing entertainment for all. We all got to know each other a bit better over a delicious cheese board and barbeque – the perfect way to end an awesome day. Lots of love to everyone reading this, especially Mum, Barney, Riv and Trin! Lucy (white watch) and Sarah (Red watch)
A comfort zone is a beautiful place, but nothing ever grows there.